Microbial Community Management in Aquaculture

Microbial Community Management in Aquaculture

Procedia Food Science, Volume 6, 2016, Pages 37-39
P. Bossier, P. De Schrijver, T. Defoirdt, H.A.D. Ruwandeepika, F. Natrah, J. Ekasari, H. Toi, D. Nhan, N. Tinh, G. Pande, I. Karunasagar, G. Van Stappen

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.profoo.2016.02.007

Under a Creative Commons license

The expansion of the aquaculture production is restricted due to the pressure it causes on the environment by the discharge of waste products in the water bodies and by its dependence on fish oil and fishmeal. Aquaculture using bio-floc technology (BFT) offers a solution to both problems.

All biofloc size classes were consumed and utilized by the shrimp, tilapia and mussel. The highest retention of nitrogen in the animal body, however, was consistently originating from the bioflocs larger than 100μm

Survival in the [immunity] challenge tests with shrimp from the biofloc [fed] groups, was also significantly higher compared to the positive control.

Rather than trying to control microbial community composition, microbial activity can be steered. The disruption of quorum sensing, bacterial cell-to-cell communication, has been suggested as an alternative strategy to control infections in aquaculture 5.

Recent studies also indicate that opportunistic aquatic pathogens[…]are also able to sense host clues such as stress hormones.

 

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